Archive | Student writings RSS feed for this section

“Mis palabras” – perspectives on police brutality by a young writer

28 Oct

This is a guest post by a high school student in Seattle, describing how police arrested her partner with guns drawn outside her school.  She reflects on this incident in the context of recent waves of police brutality and anti-Black violence in Ferguson and across the country.  

Mis palabras

I have come to an ending point in life on how everything is and has changed. I remember when I was younger, I used to want to be a cop, but now we all don’t like them. Why? Because they are not doing their job.

How are they not doing their jobs? This is how. They go out shooting people for no reason, For example Mike Brown got shot. I feel like it was because he was a black male. To the cops all black people are bad, so if you’re black and you make a mistake, you’re going to deal with them.

Also Trayvon Martin got shot for no reason and police did nothing to the guy who shot him. Who has more say? A black kid or a white guy, of course we all know the answer to that. I feel that police are going around doing this because they think they are better than anyone. Bet you if they take the badge off they would be everyday people like us.

Recently Vonderrit Myers was shot in St. Louis because someone had called the police and told them he had a gun. Once again, he had no weapon. He was just going to buy a sandwich and he purchased it. Another life taken for no real harmful reason, all because they thought to see a gun.

In Louisiana, a 22 year old man named Victor White was arrested, handcuffed behind his back and put in a police car. The police said that he shot himself in the back while he was handcuffed. In the final review of the body, they had said that the gun shot went through the front of his chest, not the back. The police had tried to hide that they had shot him. We won’t know the truth I am guessing, they can say something but the police will be the only ones to know, right?

All of them are black males. To me its discrimination. It makes me think what if I was black would I be walking around scared to get shot, to be worried about my every move, not able to feel safe in my own community? We have cops going around thinking they can just come and shoot people and make it seem like they’re the good guys, that they did it because of danger. No, that’s not right. Can I come in any police’s face and feel like I’m in danger and shoot them, will I have a word to say I was in danger and get away with it? I don’t think so….

Something just happened in my school, a place where I felt safe and we are supposed to feel safe to come. It is no longer a safe place for me. They took some one I care for, my partner, my best friend. The way they took him was the worst. I won’t be able to forget that they had cops everywhere, guns pointing at him. And I bet you they did all this because they thought he had a gun too because he is black, because they felt danger. He is a young man that had done nothing wrong. To come to my school and arrest him in that way… I think to myself every night what if it was his life next? What if they would have shot him just because he was black? That’s what it’s all about now in my opinion.

When I’m alone, I always think to myself what would the world be without the cops? Would it be better or would it get worse? In my opinion, I think it would be better because I can do a better job than they do. I would be able to keep my community a safe place, making sure I don’t discriminate based on your color. I sit back and think how it was back in the day when slavery was happening, how black people had no rights to defend themselves. Is it happening again? Are we going back to something that was worked so hard on to have black people be safe and have rights?

By: Katherin Arana

Youth Rally For Trayvon and the Prison Strikers

18 Jul

This week people have taken to the streets in mass protests across the country, furious that George Zimmerman was acquitted after killing Trayvon Martin, a Black teenager in Florida.   High school students in Seattle are moving this struggle forward by organizing their own rally on Tuesday, the 23rd, at 1:30 in front of the King County Courthouse.   They are pointing out that Trayvon’s death is part of a racist system, the same system that denies them a meaningful education.  By taking action they are learning through practice, and making history instead of just taking tests about it.  They are also teaching the rest of us that this generation is tired of being imprisoned, miseducated, and gunned down.  Like the prison hunger strikers, they are showing it is possible to come together across racial, communal, and neighborhood lines.

1003150_1394139197472221_1337673584_nHere is the call to action they posted on their Facebook page:

We the youth are deciding to come together in solidarity to protest on the behalf of trayvon martin and against the other injustices of the system. We the youth of color are profiled by police, we are more likely to get arrested and go to jail then finish high school, and our families are scared for our safety. We are tired of every obstacle that stands in our way. We are looked down on as the minority but together we are the majority. We are asking for other youth and adults to come together in solidarity to help protest with us. Not just for trayvon martin but for other youth that may have lost their lives. All races, ages, and neighborhoods are welcome to come!! We were inspired by the strike at the California and the Green hill prisons and we participated in the rally at the King County prison.

It is significant that students are making connections between the West Coast prison hunger strikes and the struggle against racist vigilantes like Zimmerman, seeing both the prison system and violence by individual vigilantes as obstacles to their growth.  I have been surprised that more people are not making these connections.  One of the students involved in organizing this rally also did her own hunger strike last week, in solidarity with the striking prisoners.

One student also wrote:

Youth in my community are devastated about the many injustices of our system. people think that just because we are young we have no say or even care about what goes on in our justice system, we are labeled as a minority but together we are the majority. I believe that if we come together and make our voices heard we will make a bigger statement of how serious we really are. Treyvon Martin, john t Williams these are not the only injustices. if you want to stand up for human rights don’t be afraid to fight. There is going to be a cypher session and poetry will be read. This page is for youth to organize, adults we would like for you to stand with us because this is not over we demand justice. come support us justice for everyone.

Please spread the word, and if you can, please print out the flyer above and pass it out.  Thanks!

 

Seattle High School Student On Hunger Strike In Solidarity with Striking Prisoners

12 Jul
Prisoners at Green Hill youth prison in WA state are on strike.  This banner was hung on the prison fence during a solidarity demonstration on Monday 6/8

 This banner was hung on the Green Hill youth prison fence during a solidarity demonstration on Monday 6/8

I received this letter from a high school student who attended this week’s rally in solidarity with the California and Green Hill prison strikes. She told me she shared it with King 5 News but they never responded to her. I am posting it here with her permission, to make the public aware of her courageous action and her insightful critiques of the school and prison systems. Please share this widely. 

Hi,

My name is Alondra Garcia. I’m 16 years old, from Evergreen High School (AAA). I wanted to share that I’ve been on hunger strike since Thursday morning, July 11th, in solidarity with the prisoners who are on hunger strike in California prisons and in the Green Hill Youth prison here in Washington State. I had also fasted on Monday the 8th and Tues the 9th for the same reasons. I decided to restart my hunger strike on the 11th for religious reasons.

I want to say that I believe that everyone should get an education; as long as we don’t get it out here in our population, it causes people to go through the wrong things and get into bad situations. The bad situations cause them to get imprisoned, and when they are imprisoned most of the prisoners want to change but don’t get the chance to change because we are not supporting them. When we, the people, don’t give them any chances, then they have a great chance of going back due to the fact that we are constantly telling them they don’t belong with the outside population and we’re telling them they have no opportunities to work with most jobs.

The “prisoners” are treated as lesser than the rest of us, and it’s not right to judge someone who had to do what he had to do to survive. If people and the system really want there not to be so much violence, they need to stop putting them down and support them on their way to change, and give them the proper education they didn’t get and they now want to learn.

Please hear me out when I say that the public schools only teach us how to be a worker, but in private schools they get taught how to be the boss. There is so much injustice in the justice system and the schools that we, the students, go to. If they want us to graduate then the school system should at least try to help improve, but instead they just talk and talk but never help as much. They don’t clarify what we need to do and don’t actually give us an explanation of why we need to learn it. They give us tests on subjects we didn’t learn about. To make it worse, they base their decisions of how many jails to build on those test scores.

The system is manipulating the youths’ thinking and decreasing their mentality so that they think they are never going far. We are the future, and the prisoners got a right to get treated better. They should have a chance to change and become a better person.

THANK YOU

Sincerely,

Alondra Garcia

“I set myself an assignment, to get every race united”

28 Jun
A young intellectual's rejection of institutional education

A page from a young intellectual’s notebook

This poem was written by one of my students, and I am sharing it with his permission.  He self-identifies as indigenous, from Oaxaca and South Park.    In this poem, he talks about how school reproduces white supremacy, and concludes that in order to stop this he needs to set himself an assignment, to unite the  races against the system, replacing the rich white people’s state apparatus with multi-racial “self-government”.

In my experience, this poem is a solid representation of a growing anti-racist and anti-capitalist philosophical tendency among the youth I work with, most of whom have dropped out or fallen behind in school.  I have met dozens of students like this author, who are tired of the Eurocentric curriculum, high stakes testing, and discipline of the schools.  They say these exist only to prepare them for non-existent jobs or mountains of college debt they will never pay back.

They say they are tired of the beef  (conflicts) that high school concentrates, where the classrooms become like  prison yards dividing and conquering Blacks vs. Mexicans vs. Natives, with the help of police who instigate this violence in the name of  controlling gangs.   They are also struggling to create an  intellectual milieu of  thinkers who are willing to learn from each other, through hip hop, independent  social media,  some critical engagement with anarchist and communist revolutionary literature, and  social movements like Occupy, anti-police brutality protests, etc.   At times, this intellectual tendency  is expressed as criticism of current events (such as the Seattle media’s portrayal of May Day protestors mentioned in this poem), and other times it is expressed as conspiracy theories about the Illuminati (which can go in either left wing or right wing directions).

While some teachers and other adults may dismiss this author because of his stridency, his “slang”, or his spelling errors, they would be missing out on a chance to understand the frustrations, the ideas, and the desires of one of the people who will be most likely to create  movements that will shake this society to it’s core.

I also want to mention that some of the students who reject and criticize school also defend their schools from budget cuts and other neoliberal attacks; students have walked out on this basis across the country.   Some have emphasized they want some stability in their lives, and are looking for this in classrooms which they don’t want disrupted by school closings and repeated teacher layoffs and transfers.  Isn’t it possible to desire this stability while still rebelling against the control and conformity that come along with it under the current system?

In any case, if these youth can manage to create ways to learn and “do their research” together as this poem says, they just may be able to develop the theories and strategies necessary to start a movement.  And that movement might flow back into the classrooms, shaking up the education system in some necessary ways.  It just might infuse classroom discussions with a defribulator’s voltage  of critical, social creativity and self-government – enough to break through  the schools’ control systems, creating more freedom for all of us.